Interview of Egyptian Women and Praying Practice Part 2

I hope you are all staying safe and well.
I am sharing my travel vlog with you in hopes that we can understand each other more.
We are ALL in this together.

I am posting the transcription of these videos because the worlds these Egyptian women were telling me were so powerful:
What do you KNOW you do NOT understand about other cultures, and what do you WISH you did?I wanted to cover the subject of praying in Egypt and many of the Muslim countries.

I’m learning so much history about why they pray five times a day, but I really want to get into more details so that you can understand how important it is for them to pray to their God. And I know in our country, we also pray a lot, and there are lots of people who are Christians. Catholics are very religious as well, but we usually pray in our thoughts, and maybe for me, I’m always talking to God. That’s how I pray. But I don’t actually set times to pray. And this is the wonder of this culture. So, I would love to ask you, your husband had shared with me that there are five times that you should pray, which is 5:00 AM, 12:00 PM, 3:00 PM, 5:00 PM, and 7:00 PM, right?

Speaker 2:
Yes.

Didi Wong:
So, what I’m curious about, and anyone of you can answer, is if it starts at 5:00 AM, is that the morning prayers? What if people don’t wake up at 5:00 AM? What if they wake up at 7:00 AM? Is it just a morning prayer or does it actually have to be at 5:00 AM?

Speaker 2:
You must made that between five and six.

Didi Wong:
Between 5:00 and 6:00 AM.

Speaker 2:
So, we must wake up early. It’s a good thing for our health. Something a lot makes good, good things for us.

Didi Wong:
Yes.

Speaker 2:
Okay, so…

Didi Wong:
We organize our life.

Speaker 3:
Because that teaches us discipline.

Didi Wong:
Discipline, yes.

Speaker 3:
Yes. So one thing is that there is a gap between, so it gives you time to catch the prayer. So it’s not just 12:00 PM everywhere in the world. It’s related to the position of the sun. So, the very first prayer is from dawn to sunrise.

Speaker 3:
So between within this time, you can pray the Fajr.

Didi Wong:
I see.

Speaker 3:
Which is, two rakats, which is maximum 10 minutes or something.

Didi Wong:
Right.

Speaker 3:
So, you can pray and start your day fresh, or if you want to go back to sleep, it’s up to you. But normally it’s a good thing to do. And it’s nice to start your day early so you get rewarded for that.

Didi Wong:
Wow. So that means that if you are in a job or something, that you don’t actually have to wake up at 5:00 AM, people still wake up between five and six to pray?

Speaker 3:
Yes.

Didi Wong:
And then they could go back to sleep until whatever time they need to wake up. But it is a discipline that they have to wake up and to do this.

Speaker 3:
Exactly.

Didi Wong:
So you would say any Muslim who believes in this, will do this. Wow. And how great is that to bring the nation together, bring the culture, bring the religion, religious Muslims together. And then the next one is at 12:00, but you said not necessarily at 12:00.

Speaker 3:
Yes, it’s in the afternoon. And the same as the sunrise, it’s perpendicular. So it’s the hottest time in the day.

Didi Wong:
Oh, the hottest time. See, this is beautiful. The hottest time of the day. Yes, we believe that is 12:00.

Speaker 3:
Yes.

Didi Wong:
We always say don’t go sunbathing at 12:00. Not that I sunbathe. Because I’m allergic to the sun, but 12:00, the hottest time of the day.

Speaker 3:
Yes.

Didi Wong:
And then what about the 3:00 PM?

Speaker 3:
Yes, this is the house prayer as well. And actually, one thing that I really think of the Salat or the prayer, actually the word prayer in Arabic is Salat. Salat means connection.

Didi Wong:
Salat, oh, I love that.

Speaker 3:
Connection between you and your creator. And I would say, if I was like, we have a mobile phone and then we have to charge it every now and then so it keeps going.

Didi Wong:
Right?

Speaker 3:
That’s for me, how prayer goes.

Didi Wong:
Oh! I love that.

Speaker 3:
So prior at the beginning, yes, it chores me to start the day, and then when it’s the hottest time of the day I take another break. I make , we’ll do it before we pray, which is really refreshing.

Didi Wong:
Oh, sweet.

Speaker 3:
So then, I charge, and then I’m being go back and complete my day. And then when the charge is going, and then we have another prayer, and so on and so forth. And then we end the day with another prayer.

Didi Wong:
I love that idea of recharging when you pray. That is beautiful.

Speaker 3:
And this is why it’s Salat, or connection. It keeps you connected.

Didi Wong:
Now, I heard.

Speaker 4:
Yes. The exact translation for the word.

Didi Wong:
Salat.

Speaker 4:
Yes. Salat is connection.

Didi Wong:
Connection. I love that.

Speaker 4:
Teach you that, yeah, even if you’re busy, you have a time for God every day [inaudible 00:04:30]. Even if you’re busy, you have five times a day to break. You know?

Didi Wong:
No, you should take that advice. Even if it’s not praying, actually everyone should take that advice. We should take breaks every single day. All day in between intervals so that you can recharge yourself so that you’re not so stressed. I know, for sure in other nations, they do not.

Speaker 2:
It’s like meditation.

Didi Wong:
All day. Yes. Meditation. Yes. Wow.

Speaker 2:
If you have five times meditations a day, what…

Didi Wong:
You will be very good.

Speaker 2:
Yes.

Didi Wong:
You will relax and let go of the stress so much.

Speaker 2:
And do you know about wudu?

Didi Wong:
No.

Speaker 2:
Wudu, okay. Explain her about wudu.

Speaker 3:
Yeah, so the wudu is before you pray, you need to be in, you need to make wudu. Wudu is that you wash some specific parts of your body, like your hands, and then you will have…

Didi Wong:
Your mouth?

Speaker 3:
Yes. And then the face, and then you do your…

Didi Wong:
Up the forearms.

Speaker 3:
Yes, til here.

Didi Wong:
Okay.

Speaker 3:
Okay. So that actually refreshes you, because one thing that we say-

Didi Wong:
Wow.

Speaker 3:
When you connect to God, you need to purify yourself internally, like from inside. So when you pray, because sometimes when you’re in the job, in the office, someone could say something, it’s like, I’ll just take, I’ll just want to envy. There’s some bad feelings that could happen. So you purify yourself out from the outside by washing you, and then that reminds you to purify yourself from inside before connecting with them. So if you have some bad feelings from, against or towards someone in the office, you take this away.

Didi Wong:
Amazing.

Speaker 3:
You go pray, and then when you come back, if you are mad at this person, that’s a-

Didi Wong:
And it also keeps you clean.

Speaker 3:
Yes. We have this now.

Didi Wong:
I’m always thinking of the advantages.

Speaker 2:
Yes.

Didi Wong:
And the very last question I have for you, if you guys don’t mind, I know you praying for 10 minutes, but can we all hold hands and say a prayer? Are we are allowed to hold hands?

Speaker 2:
Yes we are.

Speaker 3:
Yes.

Didi Wong:
So we can say anybody just a quick prayer so we can hear it. Oh, one thing I did notice, when I hear the speakers in the city, you guys pray in a very musical way.

Speaker 2:
Yeah. Yeah.

Didi Wong:
I love that, because I’m a musical person and I love music and I love the highs and lows. And you’re not just saying a prayer, you know, just monotone.

Speaker 2:
We try that makes your spirit high.

Didi Wong:
Yes, so.

Speaker 3:
Actually, the thing that you heard in the speakers is we call for the prayers, because it’s better if we pray together.

Didi Wong:
Yes.

Speaker 3:
So that brings us together.

Didi Wong:
Well that’s, oh!

Speaker 4:
If you pray together, we get more rewards.

Didi Wong:
More. Yes. So let’s pray together.

Speaker 4:
Yes. But this is not how we pray.

Didi Wong:
Oh, this is not? Okay, tell me, tell me.

Speaker 4:
This is, we call it dua, like we’re asking God for something.

Didi Wong:
Yes.

Speaker 4:
But how we pray, we do some physical stuff, you know? Yeah.

Didi Wong:
Oh, okay.

Speaker 3:
We stand side by side.

Didi Wong:
So, am I allowed to ask you to show me one? Or is that weird?

Speaker 3:
Yeah, sure. Sure.

Didi Wong:
Yes. So, okay. So I don’t need to be in the video. I would love to just video one of you do a prayer. That would be amazing. If it’s okay.

Speaker 3:
Okay.

Didi Wong:
Yes. Before we do the video, I thank you, the three of you so much for sharing-

Speaker 2:
You’re welcome, you’re welcome.

Didi Wong:
…your sentiments with us. I think after this video, a lot of people will have more understanding of the Muslims and the women.

Speaker 2:
Thank you.

Didi Wong:
Especially in this culture. And I hope you enjoyed it. I’m going to show you now a video of how they pray.

Didi Wong:
So, thank you.

Speaker 3:
Just want to add one.

Didi Wong:
One more thing. Yes.

Speaker 3:
Just one last thing because you started the talk with the 9/11, and you mentioned As-Salaam-Alaikum and the meaning of it. So it means, this is the great thing of Islam. Peace be upon you, right? So this is the message of peace, but somehow the media converted or, somehow because of the media, the opposite message was, you know.

Didi Wong:
Yes.

Speaker 3:
So it’s every time you hear a Muslim saying As-Salaam-Alaikum, which how we greet each others, it’s peace be upon you. The religion of peace, actually Islam, the word Islam in Arabic comes from the origin word aslama, which has many meanings. One of them is peace and submission. So it has nothing to do with what we see in media.

Didi Wong:
Yes.

Speaker 3:
So it’s really sad. But just wanted to add that.

Didi Wong:
Yes, please. I’m so happy you see a strong woman speaking out. It’s important. It’s really important, and I really appreciate you clarifying that for us.

Speaker 3:
Okay.

Didi Wong:
Yeah. It’s sad that the media portrays you, but because of this video we’re going to see something different.

Speaker 3:
Yes!

Speaker 2:
Yeah.

Didi Wong:
Thank you.

Speaker 2:
Thank you.

I’m Didi Wong, and I invite you to study Idea To Income.

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